Mountainview Animal Hospital

Toxic Food and Plants

Bold wording indicates that a substance is especially dangerous and can be fatal.

Toxic Food:

Just because we eat it, does not mean our pets can.

  • Bones
  • Greasy poultry skin
  • Gravies and sauces
  • Alcohol
  • Almonds
  • Apricot
  • Caffeine
  • Cherry
  • Chocolate
  • Choke cherry (unripe berries)
  • Elderberry (unripe berries)
  • Garlic
  • Grapes
  • Onions
  • Peaches
  • Potato leaves and stems
  • Rhubarb leaves
  • Tomato leaves and stems

Toxic plants:

Keep your pets out of the vegetable and flower patches

  • Amaryllis bulb
  • Anthurium
  • Autumn crocus (Colchicum autumnale)
  • Azalea (entire rhododendron family)
  • Begonia
  • Bird of Paradise
  • Bittersweet
  • Bleeding heart
  • Boxwood
  • Bracken fern
  • Buckeye
  • Buttercup (Ranunculus)
  • Caladium
  • Calla lily
  • Castor bean
  • Chinese sacred or Heavenly Bamboo
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Clematis
  • Crocus bulb
  • Croton (Codiaeum sp.)
  • Cyclamen bulb
  • Delphinium, larkspur, monkshood
  • Dumb cane (Dieffenbachia)
  • English ivy (all Hedera species of ivy)
  • Fig (Ficus)
  • Four-o’clock (Mirabilis)
  • Foxglove (Digitalis)
  • Hyacinth bulbs
  • Hydrangea
  • Holly berries
  • Iris corms
  • Jack-in–the-pulpit
  • Jimson weed
  • Kalanchoe
  • Lantana
  • Lily (bulbs of most species)
  • Lily-of-the-valley
  • Lupine species
  • Marijuana or hemp (Cannabis)
  • Milkweed
  • Mistletoe berries
  • Morning glory
  • Mountain laurel
  • Narcissus, daffodil (Narcissus)
  • Oleander
  • Pencil cactus/plant (Euphorbia sp.)
  • Philodendron (all species)
  • Poinsettia
  • Potato leaves and stems
  • Rhubarb leaves
  • Rosary pea (Arbus sp.)
  • Scheffelera (umbrella plant)
  • Shamrock (Oxalis sp.)
  • Spurge (Erphorbia sp.)
  • Tomato leaves and stems
  • Yew

Reference: American Animal Hospital Association 1997

For more information, contact The ASPCA Animal Poison Control at 1-888-426-4435 or visit their website ASPCA Animal Poison Control for advice.

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FUNFACT:

At night a cat can gather into the extra-large corneas and lenses of its eyes more than six times the amount of light than humans can. Seeing far better than humans do at night time and tending to focus best at a distance of eight to twenty feet, makes cats excellent night time hunters.